Welding Glossary: 292 Crucial Terms in Welding

Welding Glossary 292 Crucial Terms in Welding

Table Of Contents

Welding Glossary 292 Crucial Terms in Welding
  1. Inert Gas Arc Welding
    Inert gas arc welding, also referred to as inert gas shielded arc welding, is a welding process that utilizes an electric arc to melt metals at the welding point. The arc’s heat is shielded by an inert gas, such as argon or helium, which protects the weld area from atmospheric contamination. This process is commonly used in high-precision welding tasks, such as in the aerospace and automotive industries, where a clean and strong weld is essential. For example, the process is often employed for welding critical components of an aircraft engine where material integrity is paramount.
  2. Hard-to-Weld
    The term “hard-to-weld” refers to metals or alloys that are difficult to join using standard welding processes. These materials might have properties such as high thermal conductivity, high alloy content, or susceptibility to cracking, which hinder the welding process. For example, certain grades of stainless steel and aluminum alloys are considered hard-to-weld due to their specific material characteristics that require specialized welding techniques and parameters.
  3. Weld-All-Over
    Weld-all-over is a term used to describe a welding operation where the entire joint or surface area is welded. This can be necessary in situations where maximum strength and seal are required, such as in pressure vessels or pipelines. An example of this would be the welding of a pipe flange where a full circumferential weld is needed to ensure no leakage.
  4. V-Weld
    A V-weld is a type of weld joint that has a V-shaped groove prepared on the edges of the material to be joined. This groove allows for better penetration of the weld metal and is typically used on thicker materials. For instance, two metal plates to be joined with a butt weld might be prepared with a V-groove to ensure a strong, penetrating weld.
  5. Butt-Weld
    Butt-welding is the process of joining two pieces of material end-to-end. The materials, often metal or thermoplastics, are aligned along a single plane and welded along the seam. Butt-welding is a common method for connecting pipes in a pipeline system.
  6. Welding
    Welding is a fabrication process that joins materials, typically metals or thermoplastics, by causing coalescence. This is usually done by melting the workpieces and adding a filler material to form a pool of molten material that cools to become a strong joint. Welding can be performed in various environments, including open air, underwater, and in outer space.
  7. U-Weld
    A U-weld is made by preparing a U-shaped groove on the edges of the material to be welded. This groove design is beneficial for thicker materials where it allows for complete penetration and reduces the amount of filler material needed. It is often used for high-strength applications, such as pressure vessel construction.
  8. X-Weld
    An X-weld is a joint design where two opposite sloping surfaces are prepared on each piece of work to form an X-shaped groove when the pieces are placed together. This type of weld allows for deep penetration and is typically used for thick materials, providing strong welds in structural applications like bridge construction.
  9. Cast-Weld
    Cast-welding, sometimes known as cast iron welding, involves the welding of cast iron parts. Cast iron can be challenging to weld due to its carbon content and potential for cracking. Specialized techniques, often involving preheating and the use of nickel-based filler materials, are utilized to mitigate these issues.
  10. Double U-Weld
    A double U-weld is a joint preparation where two U-shaped grooves are created back-to-back on both sides of the material to be welded. This allows for deep weld penetration on both sides, which is particularly useful for very thick materials. It is often used in heavy industry where the strength of the weld is critical.
  11. Tack-Weld
    Tack welding is a temporary joining process used to hold components in the proper alignment until the final welding can be performed. Tack welds are small welds that are spaced out along the joint. It is comparable to basting in sewing or using clamps in woodworking.
  12. All-Welded
    All-welded refers to a product or structure where all connections and joints have been completed using welding, with no bolts, rivets, or other non-welded connections. This approach is often employed in applications where the integrity and strength of the weld are crucial, such as in high-pressure containers.
  13. Oxy-Welding
    Oxy-welding, or oxy-fuel welding, is a process that uses a flame produced by mixing oxygen with a fuel gas, usually acetylene, to melt the material along the welding joint. This type of welding is often used for repair work and in situations where portability is important, such as in pipeline construction in remote areas.
  14. Butt-Welded
    Butt-welded refers to objects that have been joined end-to-end by welding. The term emphasizes the method of welding rather than the process itself, indicating that the joint is created by aligning the materials in a single plane and welding along the seam.
  15. Press-Welding
    Press-welding, also known as pressure welding, involves joining two pieces of metal under high pressure, often without the addition of heat or filler material. This process is typically used in resistance welding, such as spot or seam welding, where the heat is generated by electrical resistance.
  16. Spot-Weld
    Spot welding is a type of resistance welding used to join overlapping metal sheets. Two electrodes are used to apply pressure and electrical current to the metal sheets, which generates heat and causes the metals to melt and form a weld at the spot. This technique is commonly used in the automotive industry for joining sheet metal components.
  17. Lap-Welded
    Lap-welded refers to a joint where two pieces of material overlap and are welded together. This method is often used for sheet metal or thin materials, providing a larger surface area for the weld compared to butt welding, which can result in a stronger joint.
  18. Space-Welding
    Space-welding is a technique where welds are made at intervals along a joint rather than continuously. This can be used to control distortion, reduce the amount of welding consumables, or accommodate design requirements where continuous welding is not necessary.
  19. Weld-Edgewise
    Welding edgewise refers to a welding process where the edge of one material is joined to the surface or edge of another, often at a right angle. This type of welding is commonly used in the construction of frames or boxes where the edges of the materials must be joined to form a corner.
  20. Forge-Welding
    Forge-welding is an ancient process where two pieces of metal are heated to a high temperature and then hammered or pressed together to create a joint. This technique predates modern welding processes and is still used in some traditional blacksmithing and artistic metalworking applications.
  21. Welding Lead
    A welding lead is a conductor that transfers current from a welding power source to the welding electrode. In the case of arc welding, it consists of a cable assembly which includes an electrode holder at one end and a connector for the power source at the other.
  22. Crotch Weld
    A crotch weld, also known as a fillet weld, is used to join two pieces of metal at right angles to each other. It is named for its triangular cross-section which resembles a crotch. This type of weld is commonly used in the construction of frames and other structures where members meet at right angles.
  23. Weld Nut
    A weld nut is a specialized nut that is designed to be welded to another object. It provides a strong, permanent thread for screw or bolt connections in metal workpieces and is often used in applications where the back side of the workpiece is inaccessible.
  24. Arc Welding
    Arc welding is a process that uses an electric arc to melt and join metals. The intense heat generated by the arc melts both the base metal and the filler metal, which upon cooling, forms a strong joint. It is a widely used welding method due to its versatility and the ability to weld many different types of metals.
  25. Weld Time
    Weld time refers to the duration for which the welding process is applied to create a weld. It is a critical parameter in resistance welding and affects the quality and strength of the weld. Proper weld time ensures adequate heat generation for a good weld, while minimizing defects and material degradation.
  26. Welding Position
    Welding position indicates the orientation in which welding is performed. Different positions (flat, horizontal, vertical, and overhead) affect the difficulty of the welding process and the approach taken by the welder. The position influences the welding technique and the quality of the weld.
  27. Intermittent Weld
    Intermittent welding, also known as stitch welding, involves a series of welds made with spaces between them, rather than a continuous weld. This method reduces heat input, minimizes distortion, and is often used in sheet metal applications or where reduced weld strength is sufficient.
  28. Automatic Welding
    Automatic welding refers to a welding process that is performed by robots or specialized machines without the need for constant direct control by a welder. It is commonly used in high-production environments to increase efficiency, consistency, and safety while reducing labor costs.
  29. Welding Stress
    Welding stress is the internal stress that develops within a material due to the thermal expansion and contraction during the welding process. If not properly managed, welding stress can lead to warping, distortion, or even cracking of the welded parts.
  30. Welding Flame
    The welding flame is the heat source in gas welding processes, such as oxyacetylene welding. It is the result of combustion of a mixture of a fuel gas and oxygen, and it is used to melt the base and filler metals to form the weld.
  31. Welding Symbol
    Welding symbols are standardized icons used on blueprints and technical drawings to convey detailed information about the type of welds required for a particular joint. They provide instructions on weld size, length, type, and location, ensuring clear communication between designers and welders.
  32. Welding Equipment
    Welding equipment encompasses the tools and machinery used in the welding process, including welding machines, electrodes, torches, protective gear, and accessories. Proper equipment selection is essential for achieving desired weld quality and for the safety of the welder.
  33. Weld Spacing
    Weld spacing refers to the distance between individual welds in a series, particularly in intermittent welding. It is a crucial factor in controlling distortion and ensuring that the overall strength of the welded structure meets requirements.
  34. Butt Resistance Welding
    Butt resistance welding is a process where two pieces of metal are joined end-to-end using heat generated from resistance to electric current. It’s commonly used for joining rails, pipes, and rods, and is advantageous for its speed and efficient energy use.
  35. Welding Sequence
    The welding sequence is the order in which welds are made on a workpiece. It is planned to minimize distortion by balancing the heat input and controlling the welding stresses. An optimal welding sequence can be critical for maintaining the dimensional accuracy of the final assembly.
  36. Autogenous Welding
    Autogenous welding is a welding process in which no filler material is used. The metal edges are melted together by using a heat source, such as a laser or a gas torch, to create the weld. This type of welding is often used for thin materials and for applications where a smooth and clean joint is desired.
  37. Tight Weld
    A tight weld refers to a weld that is completely sealed and free from any leaks. This is particularly important in applications requiring gas or liquid containment, such as in pressure vessels or pipelines.
  38. Weld Length
    Weld length is the measure of how long a weld extends along the joint being welded. It is a significant factor in determining the strength of the joint and is specified based on the requirements of the structure and the loads it will carry.
  39. Welding Symbols
    Similar to welding symbol (singular), welding symbols (plural) are the set of standardized icons used on blueprints and technical drawings to specify the details of the welding requirements. They illustrate all necessary welds for a project, ensuring accurate and consistent welding execution.
  40. Welding Current
    Welding current is the flow of electric charge through the welding circuit during the welding process. It is measured in amperes (A) and can be direct (DC) or alternating (AC). The amount and type of current influence the heat generated, arc stability, and weld penetration.
  41. Welding Ground
    The welding ground, also known as a work clamp, is part of the welding circuit that provides a return path for the welding current from the workpiece back to the welding machine. A good ground connection is crucial for maintaining a stable arc and preventing weld defects.
  42. Weld Size
    Weld size refers to the dimensional characteristics of a weld, including width, depth, and cross-sectional area. It is a critical specification for the design and strength of the weld, and it must be controlled to meet structural requirements.
  43. Explosive Welding
    Explosive welding is a process where two dissimilar metals are permanently joined by using a controlled explosive detonation to create the necessary heat and pressure. This unique method allows for the bonding of metals that cannot be welded by conventional means.
  44. Welding Source
    A welding source, or welding power supply, is a device that provides electrical energy for welding. It can supply either alternating current (AC) or direct current (DC) and is designed to control the voltage, current, and polarity to create the optimal conditions for the welding process.
  45. Friction Welding
    Friction welding is a solid-state welding process that generates heat through mechanical friction between workpieces in relative motion to each other, with the addition of lateral force to “weld” the materials together. It is often used for joining dissimilar metals and for applications requiring high-quality joints.
  46. Seam Welding
    Seam welding, also known as resistance seam welding, is a process that produces a continuous, leak-tight weld along the seam of two overlapping pieces of metal. It employs rotating wheel electrodes to apply pressure and electrical current to create the weld, commonly used in the fabrication of tanks and pipes.
  47. Ultrasonic Welding
    Ultrasonic welding uses high frequency ultrasonic vibrations to create heat through friction, bonding materials together at a molecular level. It is widely used for joining plastics and thin metals without the need for adhesives or external heat sources.
  48. Bead Weld
    A bead weld is a single pass of welding, often used as a surface layer to add material to a workpiece, such as when building up a worn surface. It can also refer to the shape of the deposited filler metal, resembling a string of beads, in both continuous and intermittent welding.
  49. Horizontal Welding
    Horizontal welding refers to welding operations where the weld axis is approximately horizontal, and the weld face lies in a vertical plane. This position can be challenging due to the effects of gravity and often requires skillful technique to produce quality welds.
  50. Forge Welding
    Forge welding is an ancient process where two pieces of metal are heated in a forge and then hammered or pressed together to create a joint. It is one of the oldest welding techniques known, traditionally used by blacksmiths to join iron and steel.
  51. Welding Flux
    Welding flux is a chemical agent used in the welding process that facilitates the welding by cleaning the metal surfaces, preventing oxidation, and enhancing the flow of molten material during the welding process. Fluxes can come in various forms such as powders, pastes, or liquids depending on the welding method. In arc welding, flux is often integrated into the electrode coating, while in processes like brazing and soldering, it is applied separately.
  52. Welding Transformer
    A welding transformer is an electrical device that transforms the high voltage and low current electricity from the power source to a lower voltage and higher current suitable for welding. This allows for the creation of an electric arc between the welding electrode and the metal workpieces, melting the materials to create a strong joint. Welding transformers are essential for arc welding processes such as shielded metal arc welding (SMAW).
  53. Weld Penetration
    Weld penetration refers to the depth to which the weld metal fuses with the base metal. Good penetration is crucial for the strength of the welded joint, as it indicates the extent of bonding between the weld metal and the workpieces. Insufficient penetration can lead to weak joints and potential failure under stress.
  54. Blacksmith Welding
    Blacksmith welding, also known as forge welding, is a traditional process where two pieces of metal are heated in a forge and then hammered together to create a joint. This technique dates back to the Iron Age and is still used by blacksmiths for artistic and custom metalwork.
  55. Forge Weld
    Similar to blacksmith welding, forge weld refers to the process of joining two pieces of metal by heating them to a high temperature and then forging them together with hammer blows. This process is often used for joining simpler shapes of metals and does not require filler materials or fluxes.
  56. Enclosed Welding
    Enclosed welding is a term not commonly used in English welding terminology, and it may refer to a welding process performed within an enclosed environment, such as a chamber, where atmospheric conditions can be controlled. This is typically done to prevent contamination and to ensure the quality of the weld.
  57. Welding
    Welding is a fabrication process that joins materials, usually metals or thermoplastics, by causing coalescence. This is often done by melting the workpieces and adding a filler material to form a pool of molten material that cools to become a strong joint.
  58. Weld
    A weld is the result of the welding process, the place where two or more workpieces are joined together by fusion or pressure. Welds come in various types and are evaluated based on their strength, quality, and conformity to specific standards.
  59. Welding Head
    The welding head refers to the component of a welding machine that applies heat or pressure, or both, to the workpieces. In automated welding systems, the welding head is often part of a larger assembly that moves along the weld joint to perform the weld.
  60. Fillet Welding
    Fillet welding is a process used to join two pieces of metal at a right angle or on lap joints. The resulting weld, known as a fillet weld, is roughly triangular in shape and is one of the most common types of welds used in metal fabrication.
  61. Butt Welding
    Butt welding is a technique used to join two pieces of metal along a single plane by bringing their ends together and welding along the seam. This type of weld is commonly used for pipes and tubes, as well as sheet metal fabrication.
  62. Forward Welding
    Forward welding, also known as progression welding, is a technique where the welding torch or electrode is moved in the same direction as the weld is being laid. This method is typically used for manual welding processes such as SMAW.
  63. Butt Weld
    A butt weld is a type of joint created by butt welding. It is used to connect two flat or curved surfaces that are aligned in the same plane. Butt welds are strong and efficient and are used in a variety of applications, from pipelines to structural frames.
  64. Block Sequence Welding
    Block sequence welding is a technique used in welding thick plates where the weld is divided into smaller blocks, and each block is welded in a sequence to minimize distortion and residual stress. This method can improve the overall quality of the weld and reduce the likelihood of cracking.
  65. Welded Joint
    A welded joint refers to the point at which two or more workpieces are united by welding. The strength, quality, and characteristics of the joint are critical to the integrity of the welded structure.
  66. Seal Weld
    Seal welds are used to create a hermetic seal on containers, pipes, or other enclosures that must be leak-proof. This type of weld is designed to prevent the passage of fluids or gases through the joint area.
  67. Percussion Welding
    Percussion welding is a form of resistance welding where a high current is discharged through the workpieces over a very short period, followed by an immediate application of force. The combination of the electrical and mechanical energy creates a solid-state weld without significant melting of the base materials.
  68. Butt Seam Welding
    Butt seam welding is a process used to join two edges of metal sheets or plates that are positioned in a single line. The edges are brought together and welded to form a seam, typically using a continuous welding process such as gas metal arc welding (GMAW).
  69. Welding Torch
    A welding torch is a tool used to direct the flame or arc necessary for the welding process. In gas welding, it mixes fuel gas with oxygen to create a precise flame. In arc welding, it conducts electrical current to the electrode, which creates the arc.
  70. Weld Zone
    The weld zone is the area in and around the weld where the material has been affected by the heat of the welding process. This includes the weld metal and the heat-affected zone (HAZ), which undergoes changes in microstructure and mechanical properties.
  71. Thermit Welding
    Thermit welding, also known as exothermic bonding, is a process that uses a chemical reaction between aluminum powder and metal oxide to produce molten metal and high temperatures, which are used to weld large sections of metals, particularly for repairing railroad tracks and heavy casting.
  72. Tack Welding
    Tack welding is a method of temporarily holding components together with small welds (tacks) before completing the final weld. This technique is commonly used to maintain alignment and prevent distortion during the welding process.
  73. Fusion Welding
    Fusion welding is any welding process that melts the base metal and a filler material (if used) to form a joint upon solidification. Common types of fusion welding include arc welding, gas welding, and laser welding.
  74. Backstep Welding
    Backstep welding is a technique where the welding direction is opposite to the direction of the overall weld progression. This method can help control distortion in the weldment by spreading out the heat more evenly.
  75. Welding Force
    In resistance welding processes like spot welding, the welding force is the pressure applied by the electrodes to the workpieces to hold them together and ensure good electrical contact during welding. The force must be sufficient to produce a high-quality weld without causing damage.
  76. Edge Weld
    Edge welding is a process where the edges of two pieces of metal are joined by welding them together. This technique is often used when the pieces form a corner or when adding a strip of metal to the edge of a plate.
  77. Flash Welding
    Flash welding is a resistance welding process that involves clamping two workpieces in butt configuration. An electrical current is passed through the workpieces while they are rapidly brought together, causing flashing and heating. Once the desired temperature is reached, a force is applied to forge the heated metal and create a weld.
  78. Upset Welding
    Upset welding, also known as resistance butt welding, involves heating the ends of two workpieces and then pressing them together (upsetting) to form a joint. This process is commonly used for joining rods, pipes, and other similar cross-section components.
  79. Welded Pipe
    A welded pipe is a type of pipe manufactured by welding sheets or strips of metal into a tubular shape and then welding the seam. It can be produced using various welding methods, such as electric resistance welding (ERW) or submerged arc welding (SAW).
  80. Backhand Welding
    Backhand welding is a welding technique where the welding torch is directed towards the completed part of the weld. This method is also known as back welding and is often used in shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and gas welding for better heat control and penetration.
  81. Tack-weld
    A tack-weld is a small, temporary weld used to hold components in proper alignment until the final welding can be performed. Think of it as using a paperclip to temporarily hold pages together before they are permanently bound. In a welding context, tack-welds are essential for maintaining structural integrity before the main weld is applied.
  82. Discontinuous Welding
    Discontinuous welding, also known as intermittent welding, involves welding at regular or irregular intervals along the length of a joint, rather than in a continuous run. It is used to control distortion on thin materials or where long welds might create excessive heat.
  83. As-welded
    The term “as-welded” refers to the condition of a metal object after welding, before any additional finishing processes such as grinding or painting are performed. It describes the weld’s characteristics, such as surface roughness or the presence of weld spatter, immediately after welding.
  84. Welding Shop
    A welding shop is a facility where welding operations are carried out. It is typically equipped with various welding machines, tools, and equipment necessary for joining metal parts. Welding shops can be found in a range of settings from small, independent businesses to large industrial manufacturing plants.
  85. Welding Leads
    Welding leads are heavy-duty electrical cables that connect the welding machine to the electrode holder and work clamp. They are an integral part of the welding circuit, carrying current to create the arc for welding.
  86. Pulsation Welding
    Pulsation welding, often referred to as pulse welding, is a variant of welding that uses a pulsing current to weld at lower average temperatures. This method reduces heat input, minimizes distortion, and allows for better control over the weld bead, especially on thin materials.
  87. Strength Weld
    A strength weld is a type of weld designed to bear high loads and stresses. It is characterized by deep penetration and a strong bond between the welded materials, ensuring structural integrity and durability of the joint.
  88. Fillet Welding Joint
    A fillet welding joint is one of the most common types of welded joints, where two pieces of metal are joined at a right angle. The weld itself is triangular in shape and is used to fill in the corner created by the two pieces of metal.
  89. Parallel Welding
    Parallel welding refers to a technique where multiple welding operations are performed simultaneously along parallel lines. This is often used in automated processes to increase efficiency and productivity.
  90. Weld
    The term “weld” refers to both the process of joining metals by heating them to the point of melting and the joint that results from this process. Welding can be performed using various energy sources, including gas flames, electric arcs, lasers, and friction.
  91. Welded
    “Welded” describes the state of a material or an object that has undergone the welding process and is now joined or fused together. It implies that the materials have been successfully united into a single piece.
  92. Manual Welding
    Manual welding is a type of welding where the process is controlled by a human operator rather than an automated system. It requires skill and experience as the welder manually manipulates the welding equipment to create the weld.
  93. Resistance Welding
    Resistance welding is a welding process where heat is generated by passing a current through the resistance caused by the contact between two or more metal surfaces. Spot welding, a common type of resistance welding, is widely used in sheet metal fabrication.
  94. Welding Machine
    A welding machine is a device that provides the power and controls necessary for carrying out welding operations. It can vary in type, from simple, portable units for manual welding to complex, automated systems for industrial use.
  95. Weld Line
    A weld line refers to the linear boundary where two materials have been joined together by welding. It is the visible trace of the welding process and can be inspected for quality control purposes.
  96. Welding Heat
    Welding heat is the amount of thermal energy applied during the welding process. It is a critical factor that affects the quality of the weld, as too much or too little heat can result in weld defects.
  97. Welding Operator
    A welding operator is a skilled worker who operates welding equipment to join metal parts. This person is trained in various welding techniques and must understand the properties of the materials being welded.
  98. Block Welding
    Block welding is a technique used to reduce distortion by breaking up long welds into smaller sections, or “blocks.” Each block is welded individually, allowing the material to cool and contract before the next block is started.
  99. Welding Rod
    A welding rod, or filler rod, is a consumable metal rod used during the welding process to supply filler metal to the joint. It is melted by the heat of the welding arc to create the weld bead.
  100. Welding
    Welding is a fabrication process that joins materials, usually metals or thermoplastics, by causing coalescence. This is often done by melting the workpieces and adding a filler material to form a strong, permanent bond as the material cools.
  101. Fusion Weld
    A fusion weld is created by melting the base metal and a filler material (if used) to form a pool of molten material that solidifies to create a joint. This process does not require pressure and relies solely on heat to achieve coalescence.
  102. Slot Welding
    Slot welding is a type of weld used to join overlapping members, one of which has a slot or elongated hole. The weld is made in the hole and is used to transfer forces between the two members.
  103. Gas Welding
    Gas welding, also known as oxy-fuel welding, is a process that uses a flame produced by a mixture of oxygen and a combustible gas, such as acetylene, to melt and join metals. It is one of the oldest welding methods and is commonly used for repair work and joining thin metals.
  104. Spot Welding
    Spot welding is a resistance welding process in which two or more metal sheets are joined together by applying pressure and heat from an electric current to the weld area. It produces a series of spots at regular intervals and is commonly used in the automotive industry.
  105. Skip Welding
    Skip welding is a technique used to minimize warping or distortion by dividing a long weld into smaller segments and welding them in a non-sequential order. This allows each segment to cool and reduce stresses before another is welded.
  106. Smith Welding
    Smith welding, also known as forge welding, is an ancient and traditional process where metals are heated in a forge and then hammered or pressed together to create a joint. This method is less frequently used today but remains important for certain applications, such as blacksmithing and historical restorations.
  107. Lap Welding
    Lap welding is a process where two pieces of metal with overlapping edges are joined by welding along the edges. It is commonly used for sheet metal and can provide a strong bond due to the increased contact area between the workpieces.
  108. Plug Welding
    Plug welding is a technique used to join two pieces of metal by filling a hole in one piece with molten metal which then bonds to the surface of the second piece. It is often used to attach pieces of sheet metal together or to fill holes in metal.
  109. Flush Weld
    A flush weld is a type of weld that is ground down or otherwise finished to be level with the surrounding material surface. This creates a smooth, even appearance and is often used for aesthetic purposes or where protruding welds could interfere with the function of the part.
  110. Flat Welding
    Flat welding refers to a welding position where the weld axis is horizontal and the weld face lies in a roughly horizontal plane. This position is commonly used for its ease of execution and is one of the four basic welding positions (flat, horizontal, vertical, and overhead). Flat welding is often used in fabricating and constructing metal structures, allowing for comfortable and efficient work by the welder.
  111. Manual Welding
    Manual welding is a type of welding where the entire welding process is performed and controlled by a human welder as opposed to automated or robotic welding. This includes holding the welding torch, feeding the filler material, and adjusting the heat and angle as necessary. Manual welding is versatile and can be used in various environments but requires a high skill level to produce consistent and high-quality welds.
  112. Electric Welding
    Electric welding, commonly known as arc welding, is a process of joining metals using the heat generated from an electric arc created between an electrode and the metal workpiece. Electric welding allows for strong welds and is used in a wide range of applications, from industrial fabrication to home DIY projects. It encompasses several types such as SMAW (Shielded Metal Arc Welding), TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas), and MIG (Metal Inert Gas) welding.
  113. Spot Welding
    Spot welding is a type of resistance welding where two or more metal sheets are joined together by applying pressure and heat from an electric current to a small point. The resulting weld, known as a spot weld, is typically round in shape. This method is commonly used in the automotive industry for welding sheet metal, as it is efficient and produces strong welds without requiring filler materials.
  114. Slot Weld
    A slot weld is made in an elongated hole in one member of a lap or tee joint, joining that member to the surface of another member that is exposed through the hole. The hole can be open at one end (a slot) or closed (a hole). This type of weld is used to transfer shear stress and provide alignment and joint strength.
  115. Pressure Welding
    Pressure welding involves joining two pieces of metal together by applying pressure and heat or just pressure alone. This process can be performed at room temperature, in which case it is called cold pressure welding, or at elevated temperatures, referred to as hot pressure welding. It is commonly used for pipes and railroad rails where the application of filler materials is not practical.
  116. Projection Welding
    Projection welding is a type of resistance welding where raised projections on one or both pieces of metal concentrate the welding current, resulting in localized heat generation and the formation of a weld at each projection. This process is efficient for joining components with multiple weld points simultaneously and is often used in manufacturing nuts, bolts, and other fasteners.
  117. MIG Welding
    MIG (Metal Inert Gas) welding, also known as Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), is a process that uses a continuously fed solid wire electrode and an inert gas to shield the weld pool from contamination. It’s commonly used for its speed and adaptability to robotic automation, making it suitable for both industrial and home use.
  118. Machine Welding
    Machine welding refers to welding that is performed using automated equipment, which can range from semi-automatic systems, where the human operator controls the welding process, to fully automatic systems, where the welding is carried out without direct human intervention. This technology enhances consistency and efficiency, particularly in high-volume production settings.
  119. MAG Welding
    MAG (Metal Active Gas) welding is similar to MIG welding but uses an active gas such as carbon dioxide or a mixture of CO2 and argon to shield the weld. This active gas can affect the welding process, but it is often less expensive than the inert gases used in MIG welding. MAG welding is widely used in industries where the cost is a significant consideration and where the materials being welded do not require the more inert environment that MIG welding provides.
  120. Welding Inspector
    A welding inspector is a professional responsible for examining the quality and safety of welding works. Their duties include inspecting welds for size, shape, and compliance with specifications, ensuring that welding procedures follow safety regulations, and certifying the integrity of welds for critical structures. They play a key role in maintaining the standards in construction, manufacturing, and other industries that involve welding.
  121. Tack Weld
    Tack welds are small, temporary welds used to hold components in place before the final welding. These welds are essential for maintaining proper alignment and preventing distortion during the welding process. Once the final welds are complete, tack welds can either be left in place or removed depending on the requirements of the project.
  122. Mesh Weld
    Mesh weld refers to a type of weld used in joining wire mesh or similar materials. The wires are welded at their intersections using either resistance or fusion welding techniques to create a grid or mesh structure. This is commonly used in the construction of reinforcement for concrete, fencing, and other similar applications.
  123. Welding Head
    A welding head is the part of a welding machine that applies the weld. In automated welding systems, the welding head is mounted on a robotic arm or a fixed machine and may include components such as the electrode holder, torch, and gas nozzle. It is a critical component in ensuring the precision and quality of the welds produced by the machine.
  124. Aircomatic Welding
    Aircomatic welding is a term that is not widely used in the industry but can refer to an automated or semi-automated welding process that uses inert gas (such as argon) for shielding. It might also suggest a system that automatically adjusts the arc length during welding to maintain a consistent welding quality.
  125. Welding Outfit
    A welding outfit typically includes all the necessary equipment and accessories for a welding operation. This can consist of a welding power supply, torches, gas cylinders, hoses, regulators, and safety gear. The specific components depend on the type of welding being performed, such as TIG, MIG, or stick welding.
  126. Shallow Weld
    A shallow weld is a weld that does not penetrate deeply into the base material. This may be intentional for certain applications where deep penetration is not required or could be indicative of a poor-quality weld if full penetration was expected. Shallow welds are less durable and may not withstand significant stress or load.
  127. Site Welding
    Site welding, also known as field welding, refers to welding that is performed on-site, such as in construction or repair projects, rather than in a controlled workshop environment. This type of welding requires portable equipment and may present challenges due to varying environmental conditions, requiring welders to adapt to factors such as weather and accessibility.
  128. Heliarc Welding
    Heliarc welding, more commonly known as TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welding or GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding), is a process that uses a non-consumable tungsten electrode and an inert gas, such as helium or argon, to shield the weld area from contamination. It is known for producing high-quality, precise welds and is used in applications requiring fine control and clean results, such as aerospace and artistic metalwork.
  129. Sealing Weld
    A sealing weld is used to create a hermetic seal on containers, pipes, or other structures to prevent the escape or entry of gases or liquids. This type of weld must be impermeable and is often used in the fabrication of tanks, pressure vessels, and in industries where containment of fluids is critical.
  130. Rod Welding
    Rod welding involves the use of a consumable electrode, known as a welding rod, which is coated with flux to protect the molten weld pool from atmospheric contamination. This process is often associated with Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) or stick welding and is used in a variety of applications due to its simplicity and versatility.
  131. Back Weld
    A back weld is made on the reverse side of a joint after completing a root pass from the opposite side. This process reinforces the joint and ensures full penetration and strength of the weld. Back welding is critical in applications where the integrity of the weld is essential, such as in pressure vessels and pipelines.
  132. Welding Torch
    A welding torch is a tool used to direct the heat and filler material during a welding process. It is essential in welding methods like oxy-fuel welding, TIG, and MIG welding. The torch controls the flame or arc and the delivery of shielding gas and is crucial for achieving a stable and controlled weld.
  133. Welded Chert
    Welded chert is not a welding term but a geological one, referring to a type of rock that has been naturally fused together under high temperatures and pressures, often found in volcanic environments. It is not related to the process of welding metals or other materials.
  134. Horizontal Welding
    Horizontal welding refers to a welding position where the weld axis is approximately horizontal, but the weld is made on the upper side of an approximately horizontal surface and against an approximately vertical surface. It is one of the standard welding positions and can be more challenging than flat welding due to gravity affecting the weld pool.
  135. Butt Weld
    A butt weld is a type of joint where two pieces of metal are aligned edge to edge and welded along their juncture. This common type of connection is used for pipes, plates, and other components that require a smooth and continuous surface at the joint. Butt welds are generally used when the strength and integrity of the welded structure are a priority.
  136. Sigma Welding
    Sigma welding is not a standard term in the welding industry. It may be a proprietary name or a misinterpretation of a welding process. It could potentially be confused with MIG (Metal Inert Gas) welding, which sometimes uses the Greek letter sigma (σ) as a symbol for electrical conductivity or other properties related to the welding process.
  137. Welding Regulator
    A welding regulator is a device that controls the pressure and flow of gases used in welding, such as oxygen, acetylene, or inert shielding gases. It is attached to the gas cylinder and ensures a stable and appropriate gas flow rate to the torch, which is crucial for maintaining the quality and consistency of the weld.
  138. Welding Converter
    A welding converter is an electrical device that transforms electrical current from one form to another to create an appropriate current type and level for welding. These converters can change alternating current (AC) to direct current (DC) or vice versa, depending on the welding process requirements. An example of its application is in TIG welding, where a welding converter might be used to supply a stable DC output from an AC power source.
  139. Wandering Welding
    Wandering welding, also known as skip welding, involves welding at intermittent points or sections along the joint to be welded instead of a continuous seam. This method is used to minimize heat input and distortion by allowing each welded section to cool before welding adjacent areas. For instance, when welding a long seam on a thin metal sheet, wandering welding can prevent warping of the material.
  140. Series Welding
    Series welding refers to a technique where multiple electrodes are used simultaneously on one side of the workpiece to create a series of welds. This is often used in resistance welding processes where the current is passed through each electrode in sequence. An example would be in the manufacturing of metal drums, where series welding ensures continuous, leak-proof seams.
  141. Flash Welding
    Flash welding is a resistance welding process where the workpieces are brought together at high speed to produce a flashing action and intense heat, resulting in the metal surfaces melting and fusing together. Flash welding is often used in joining end-to-end components, such as railway rails.
  142. Weld Porosity
    Weld porosity refers to the presence of small cavities or pores within the welded joint, typically caused by trapped gas and impurities. These pores can weaken the weld and lead to failure under stress. A common cause of porosity is inadequate shielding gas coverage in processes like MIG or TIG welding.
  143. Bevel Weld
    A bevel weld is a type of joint where one or both edges of the workpieces are angled, typically to create a V-shaped groove, in preparation for welding. Beveling increases the surface area for welding, allowing for deeper penetration and a stronger joint. It is commonly used in pipe welding where thick-walled pipes are joined.
  144. Welding Goggles
    Welding goggles are protective eyewear that shield the welder’s eyes from harmful light radiation, sparks, and debris during welding. They are equipped with special filters to reduce the intensity of the visible and ultraviolet light. Welders use goggles in processes like gas welding and cutting, where full face protection is not necessary.
  145. Weld Nugget
    A weld nugget is the localized, fused zone between workpieces created by a spot welding process. This nugget is formed by the heat generated from electrical resistance and the force applied by the electrodes. The size and quality of the weld nugget are critical in determining the strength of the spot weld.
  146. Welding Terminals
    Welding terminals are the points on a welding machine where the welding cables are connected. These terminals ensure the secure and effective transfer of electrical power from the welding machine to the welding arc. Proper connection and maintenance of the terminals are vital for safe and efficient welding operations.
  147. Weld Pass
    A weld pass refers to a single progression of welding along a joint. The complete weld might require multiple passes, especially in thick materials or when using specific welding techniques. Each pass contributes to the total weld build-up and is critical in achieving the required weld penetration and profile.
  148. Scarf Weld
    Scarf welding is a method in which the ends of two workpieces are beveled or tapered before welding. The beveled surfaces are then overlapped and welded together. This type of weld is used for joining sections of metal where a smooth, flush finish is required, such as in the construction of metal tubes or airplane fuselages.
  149. Scarf Welding
    Scarf welding, similar to scarf weld, involves the same technique of beveling the edges of the workpieces to create an overlapped joint that is welded together. It is often used to join thin sheets of metal to ensure a smooth, continuous surface with minimal distortion.
  150. Atomic-Hydrogen Welding
    Atomic-hydrogen welding is an arc welding process that uses an arc between two tungsten electrodes in an atmosphere of hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas disassociates into atomic hydrogen in the arc and recombines at the surface of the workpiece, releasing significant heat and resulting in a high-temperature welding arc. This process was historically used for welding high-strength steels but has largely been replaced by more modern methods.
  151. Weld Area
    The weld area refers to the specific location on the workpiece where the welding process takes place. It includes the weld interface and the surrounding zones affected by the heat of welding. Proper preparation and protection of the weld area are essential to achieve a defect-free and strong weld.
  152. Linde Welding
    Linde welding is a specific historical process for welding steel pipes using an oxyacetylene flame, named after the Linde company, which was known for its developments in industrial gas production and welding technologies. This term is less commonly used today, as modern welding techniques have evolved.
  153. Flush Weld
    A flush weld is a type of weld joint where the welded material is finished to lie flush with the surrounding surface. This type of weld is often ground or machined after welding to achieve a smooth, even appearance. Flush welds are used in applications where a smooth finish is critical, such as in visible architectural elements or in surfaces that must be aerodynamic.
  154. Welding Burner
    A welding burner, or welding torch, is a tool used to direct the flame or heat source to the area to be welded. It is commonly used in gas welding and cutting processes. The burner mixes fuel gas with oxygen to create a flame capable of melting the workpiece materials to form a weld.
  155. Resistance Welding
    Resistance welding is a group of welding processes that produce coalescence of materials by the heat obtained from the resistance of the workpiece to the flow of electrical current in a circuit of which the workpiece is a part, and by the application of pressure. Common types include spot welding, seam welding, and projection welding, which are widely used in the automotive industry for joining sheet metal.
  156. Bridge Welding
    Bridge welding is a technique where additional material, known as a bridge or backing strip, is used to support or stabilize the joint during the initial stages of welding. This method is particularly useful in spot or seam welding processes to ensure proper alignment and penetration.
  157. Welding Die
    In resistance welding, a welding die, also known as an electrode, is the component that applies pressure and conducts current to the workpiece. For example, in spot welding, the die is shaped to concentrate the current at a specific point, creating the weld nugget.
  158. Flux-Cored Welding
    Flux-cored welding, or flux-cored arc welding (FCAW), is an arc welding process that uses a tubular wire filled with flux to protect the weld pool from contamination. This method combines the benefits of shielded metal arc welding with those of gas metal arc welding, and is often used in construction due to its high speed and adaptability to outdoor conditions.
  159. Welding Process
    The welding process encompasses all the steps, techniques, and methods used to join two pieces of metal or thermoplastics by coalescence. Common welding processes include gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), gas metal arc welding (GMAW), and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), each having specific applications and advantages.
  160. Electropercussive Welding
    Electropercussive welding is a specialized welding process that uses a combination of electrical discharge and mechanical impact to join small parts, often used in the electronics industry. The technique provides high-speed, high-quality welds for small components and is similar to resistance welding, but with the addition of an impact force.
  161. Pressure Welding
    Pressure welding refers to any welding process where coalescence is produced by the application of pressure alone or by pressure and heat. An example is forge welding, where two pieces of metal are heated and then hammered or pressed together to form a joint.
  162. Weld Preparation
    Weld preparation involves the steps taken to prepare the edges of the workpieces to be joined by welding. This can include cleaning, cutting, beveling, or forming the necessary groove to accommodate the weld. Proper weld preparation is critical for achieving a strong and defect-free weld.
  163. Welding Ground
    The welding ground is a safety component in welding that provides a return path for the welding current. It is a cable that connects the workpiece to the welding machine’s ground terminal to complete the electrical circuit. Proper grounding is essential to prevent electric shock and ensure stable arc characteristics.
  164. Unionare Welding
    This term appears to be a mistranslation or confusion of welding terms. It may refer to a specific welding technique involving a magnetic flux and CO2 shielding gas, but clarification is needed for a proper definition.
  165. Weld Together
    To weld together means to join two or more pieces of material using a welding process. This process involves melting the interface of the materials with or without the addition of a filler metal to form a strong bond upon cooling.
  166. Arc Welding
    Arc welding is a welding process that uses an electric arc to generate heat to melt and join metals together. The arc is struck between an electrode and the workpiece, melting both to form a weld pool that solidifies to create the joint. Shielding gas or flux is often used to protect the weld pool from atmospheric contamination.
  167. Backhand Welding
    Backhand welding, also known as back welding, is a technique used in torch welding where the torch is directed opposite to the direction of welding. This method allows for greater heat control and deeper penetration, and is often used in pipe welding and situations requiring precise heat input.
  168. Intermittent Welding
    Intermittent welding refers to a welding technique where the weld is not continuous along the entire length of the joint but is provided at intervals. This method is often used to control distortion, reduce the amount of weld material, or for aesthetic reasons. An example of its application might be in sheet metal fabrication, where intermittent welds can maintain the alignment of components without the need for a continuous weld bead.
  169. Scarf Weld
    A scarf weld is made by beveling or tapering the edges of the two pieces to be joined in such a way that they overlap each other, creating a joint that is flush and smooth after welding. This kind of weld is commonly used in pipe welding where the smooth transition is important for fluid flow.
  170. Welding Powder
    Welding powder, often referred to as flux, is a chemical compound used in welding to clean, purify, and shield the molten weld pool from atmospheric contaminants like oxygen and nitrogen. In processes like submerged arc welding (SAW), the welding powder covers the weld and melts to create a protective slag over the weld bead.
  171. Welding Point
    A welding point is a specific location where a spot weld has been made. This term is often used in resistance spot welding, where two metal surfaces are joined by applying pressure and heat generated from an electrical current. Welding points are typically used in the automotive industry for joining sheet metal.
  172. Closed-Butt Weld
    A closed-butt weld is a type of joint where the two pieces of metal to be joined are touching each other without any gap. This welding technique is commonly used in pipelines and pressure vessels where a high-quality, leak-proof joint is required.
  173. Welding Pressure
    Welding pressure is the force applied to the workpieces or the electrode during a welding process. It is critical in processes like resistance welding, where pressure ensures proper heat generation and fusion of the materials.
  174. Stick Welding
    Stick welding, also known as Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW), is a manual arc welding process that uses a consumable electrode coated with flux to lay the weld. It is a versatile and simple process widely used in construction and repair work.
  175. Commutator-Controlled Welding
    Commutator-controlled welding refers to a welding process where the power supply’s current is regulated through a commutator, allowing precise control over the welding current. This technique is essential in applications requiring fine control of the weld, such as in electronics manufacturing.
  176. Horizontal-Rolled-Position Welding
    Horizontal-rolled-position welding is a technique where the welding is performed on the upper side of a horizontal surface and against a vertical surface. It is a challenging position often used in pipe welding, where the pipe can be rotated to keep the weld at the top.
  177. Torch Welding
    Torch welding, commonly known as gas welding, uses a gas flame produced by a welding torch to melt the base material and the filler material to form a joint. This technique is widely used for repair work and in artistic metalworking.
  178. Welded Joint
    A welded joint is the junction of two or more metal parts that have been joined by welding. The strength, quality, and appearance of a welded joint are critical to the integrity of the structure. Examples include butt joints, fillet joints, and lap joints.
  179. Welding Generator
    A welding generator is a piece of equipment that provides an electrical power supply for welding. It converts mechanical energy into electrical energy specifically for use in welding processes and is ideal for remote or portable welding applications.
  180. Mash Welding
    Mash welding is a type of spot welding where crossed wires or metal strips are welded at their intersection points by being pressed and heated. This process is used in manufacturing wire meshes and grilles.
  181. Edge Weld
    An edge weld is used to join the edges of two or more metal pieces that are in a parallel or edge-to-edge relationship. This type of weld is frequently used in sheet metal work where the edges of the sheets are welded together.
  182. Field Weld
    Field weld refers to welding that is performed on-site, such as during the construction or repair of structures and pipelines. It contrasts with shop welding, which is done in a controlled environment.
  183. Welding Association
    Welding associations, such as the German Welding Society (DVS), are professional organizations that promote welding technology and education. They set standards, provide certifications, and facilitate the exchange of knowledge among welding professionals.
  184. Welding Rectifier
    A welding rectifier is a device that converts alternating current (AC) to direct current (DC) for use in welding. This conversion is essential for processes like TIG and MIG welding, which require stable DC power for operation.
  185. Cascade Welding
    Cascade welding is a multi-pass welding process where each weld layer is made in a step-like manner, resembling a cascade. This technique is used to fill large gaps or build up surfaces and is common in heavy fabrication.
  186. Welding Station
    A welding station is a designated area equipped with all the necessary tools and safety equipment for welding operations. It is designed to provide a safe and efficient environment for welders.
  187. Meshed Weld
    Meshed weld refers to a weld that is used to join mesh-like materials, such as wire mesh or grating, where the intersecting wires are welded together at the points of contact.
  188. Single-Fillet Weld
    A single-fillet weld is a triangular-shaped weld used to join two surfaces at right angles to each other. It is one of the most common types of welds used in metal fabrication for its simplicity and effectiveness.
  189. Plasma-Arc Welding
    Plasma-arc welding (PAW) is an advanced welding process that uses a constricted arc and removes the outer gas shroud, creating a plasma jet that reaches higher temperatures than TIG welding. It’s used for precision welding in aerospace and other high-tech industries.
  190. Girth Welding
    Girth welding refers to the process of joining cylindrical or spherical sections along a circular seam. This type of welding is essential in the construction of pipelines and pressure vessels.
  191. TIG Welding
    TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welding, also known as GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding), is a welding process that uses a non-consumable tungsten electrode to produce the weld. The weld area is protected from atmospheric contamination by an inert shielding gas (argon or helium).
  192. TIG-Arc Welding
    TIG-arc welding is another term for TIG welding, emphasizing the arc mechanism used in the process. The term encapsulates the same process as discussed in TIG welding (194).
  193. Air-Hydrogen Welding
    Air-hydrogen welding is a type of gas welding where a mixture of hydrogen and air (or oxygen) is used to produce a flame for welding. This method is less common today but was historically used for joining lead and other low-melting-point metals.
  194. Submerged-Arc Welding
    Submerged-arc welding (SAW) is a process that uses a continuously-fed consumable electrode and a blanket of granular flux, which becomes conductive and provides a current path between the electrode and the workpiece. It is used for welding thick materials and is known for its high quality and efficiency.
  195. Beading Weld
    A beading weld is a type of weld characterized by a rounded, bead-like appearance on the surface of the welded material. This term is often used in the context of aesthetic welds or where the weld is not meant to be ground flat.
  196. Welding Bench
    A welding bench is a robust worktable designed for holding workpieces during welding operations. It is typically made of metal and can withstand the high temperatures and spatter associated with welding.
  197. Weld Throat
    Weld throat refers to the minimum cross-sectional area of a fillet weld perpendicular to the weld axis. It is a critical dimension that determines the strength of the weld and is used in calculating the weld size needed for a particular application.
  198. HF Welding (High-Frequency Welding)
    High-Frequency (HF) welding refers to the process of fusing materials by applying high-frequency (usually radio frequency) electromagnetic waves. It’s primarily used for welding thin sheets of plastic and metal. In the case of metals, HF welding involves inducing a current in the workpiece to heat it to a molten state and then applying pressure to join the parts.
  199. Welding Engineering
    Welding engineering is a field of engineering that specializes in welding processes, equipment, and techniques. It involves the application of principles from materials science, physics, and engineering to achieve strong and reliable joins in materials. Welding engineers design welding procedures, oversee the implementation of welding operations, and ensure quality and safety standards are met.
  200. Welding Section
    The welding section refers to the cross-sectional area of a welded joint. It’s important for evaluating the strength and quality of the weld. The geometry of the welding section, such as depth and width, can affect the mechanical properties and performance of the welded structure.
  201. Inverted Weld
    An inverted weld is a type of weld joint where the weld face is concave. This can happen due to excessive welding heat input or incorrect welding technique. It is often undesirable because it can lead to reduced weld strength and potential stress concentrations.
  202. Jump-Welded Pipe
    A jump-welded pipe is a term not commonly used in professional welding terminology but could refer to a pipe welded using a jump welding technique, where welds are made in a non-continuous sequence to minimize distortion or to join sections intermittently.
  203. Intermittent Weld
    An intermittent weld, also known as stitch welding, involves a series of welds made along a joint with gaps between them. This technique is used to reduce material distortion and can be more economical than running a continuous weld.
  204. Butt-Welded Tube
    A butt-welded tube refers to a tube made by aligning two pieces end-to-end and welding along the seam. This technique is commonly used for constructing pipelines and structural tubing where a continuous length is required.
  205. Forged Weld
    A forged weld is created by heating two metal parts to a high temperature and then hammering or pressing them together. This process, also known as forge welding, was one of the first welding techniques used historically, especially in blacksmithing.
  206. Skip Weld
    Skip welding is a technique where welding is performed in an intermittent sequence along the joint, similar to intermittent welding. The welder “skips” a section and moves forward to weld another section, returning to fill the skipped sections later to control distortion.
  207. Welding Characteristics
    Welding characteristics refer to the properties and behavior of a weld during and after the welding process. These include the weld’s response to heat, its mechanical properties, the tendency to warp or distort, and its resistance to various types of stress and environmental conditions.
  208. Weld Flaw
    A weld flaw is an imperfection in the weld that can affect the integrity and performance of the welded joint. Common types of weld flaws include cracks, porosity, inclusions, and incomplete fusion.
  209. Welding Deformations
    Welding deformations are changes in the shape of the base metal or welded joint caused by the heat and cooling cycles during the welding process. These deformations can include warping, shrinking, and distortions that can affect the dimensional accuracy and structural integrity.
  210. Welded Frame
    A welded frame is a structure composed of various metal components joined together by welding. It is commonly used in the construction of machinery, vehicles, and buildings for its strength and rigidity.
  211. Projection Welding
    Projection welding is a variation of spot welding where raised sections, or projections, on one or both of the workpieces localize the welding current to form a weld. This method is often used for joining nuts or other threaded components to metal sheets.
  212. Welding Department
    The welding department within a manufacturing or construction company is the division that focuses on all welding-related activities, including production, quality control, equipment maintenance, and adherence to safety protocols.
  213. Welding Stress
    Welding stress refers to the internal stresses that develop within the material as a result of the thermal expansion and contraction during the welding process. These residual stresses can lead to distortion or even cracking if not properly managed.
  214. Helical Welding
    Helical welding is a process used for creating helical seams on cylindrical objects, such as pipes or tanks. It involves progressively welding in a helical pattern along the surface of the object.
  215. Groove-Welded Joint
    A groove-welded joint is formed by preparing the edges of the parts to be welded into a certain geometry, called a groove, which facilitates the welding process. The groove shape can vary, including V-groove, U-groove, and J-groove, depending on the requirements of the weld.
  216. Welding Characteristic
    Similar to welding characteristics, the welding characteristic generally refers to the attribute or quality of a welding process or welded joint. It encompasses aspects such as weldability, strength, toughness, and ductility.
  217. Blacksmiths Weld
    A blacksmith’s weld, or blacksmith welding, is a forge welding process where blacksmiths join metals by heating and then hammering them together. It is a traditional technique that predates modern welding methods.
  218. Weld Failure
    Weld failure occurs when a welded joint breaks or does not meet the performance criteria for which it was designed. Failures can result from poor weld quality, design flaws, inadequate material selection, or overloading.
  219. Pipe Welding
    Pipe welding is the process of joining round pipes or tubing, often used in plumbing, oil, and gas pipelines, and process piping systems. Techniques vary from butt welding to socket welding, depending on the type and size of the pipes.
  220. Weld Hardening
    Weld hardening refers to the increase in hardness and strength of the weld area due to the rapid cooling rates following welding. While increased hardness can be beneficial, it can also make the weld more brittle and susceptible to cracking.
  221. Backup Weld
    A backup weld, or back weld, is a reinforcing weld applied to the reverse side of a welded joint. It is used to ensure complete penetration and to enhance the strength of the joint.
  222. Weld Spatter
    Weld spatter consists of droplets of molten material that are expelled from the weld pool during welding. It can adhere to the surrounding surface and may require cleaning post-welding. Spatter is generally undesirable as it can affect the finish and integrity of the weld.
  223. Weld Metallurgy
    Weld metallurgy refers to the study and practice of the physical and chemical behavior of metals during the welding process. It encompasses the microstructure transformations, phase changes, and alloying effects that occur in the weld and heat-affected zones.
  224. Back-Step Welding
    Back-step welding is a technique used to minimize distortion by dividing the weld into segments and then welding each segment in the opposite direction to the overall progression. It is useful for controlling heat input and reducing the buildup of residual stresses.
  225. Welding Tangs
    Welding tangs are not a standard term but could refer to the metal pieces or grips used to hold parts in place during the welding process. They ensure proper alignment and stability, which are crucial for a good quality weld.
  226. Friction Welding
    Friction welding is a solid-state welding process that joins materials using heat generated from mechanical friction between the workpieces. The parts are rubbed together under controlled conditions of pressure and speed, leading to a high-quality joint without melting the base materials.
  227. Roll Welding
    Roll welding, a type of resistance welding, involves passing the workpieces between two rotating electrodes that apply pressure and electrical current. It’s typically used to join sheets or foils of metal by creating a series of welds as the materials pass through the rollers.
  228. Butt-Welded Seam (对焊缝)
    A butt-welded seam refers to the joint created when two metal parts are aligned edge to edge and then welded together along the same plane. This type of seam is commonly used for pipes, plates, and other components where a smooth and uniform joint is required. It is known for its strength and efficiency in material usage.
  229. Submerged Arc Welding
    Submerged Arc Welding (SAW) is a process where the welding arc is submerged beneath a blanket of granular flux. This method offers advantages like high quality, deep weld penetration, and a minimal amount of welding fume and spatter. It’s often used in industries that require large, heavy-duty metal structures, such as shipbuilding and structural steel construction.
  230. Welding Clamp
    A welding clamp is a tool used to hold and secure metal workpieces together before and during the welding process. It ensures proper alignment and stability, which is critical for achieving a strong and accurate weld.
  231. All-Around Weld
    An all-around weld is a continuous weld that extends completely around a joint, such as the circumference of a pipe or a round plate. It’s typically used to ensure a strong bond that can withstand pressure from all directions.
  232. Welding Factor
    The welding factor is a coefficient that reflects the strength of a welded joint in comparison to the base material. It’s used in the design and assessment of structures to ensure the weld is capable of handling the required loads and stresses.
  233. Weld Dressing
    Weld dressing involves the cleaning, smoothing, and shaping of the welded area after welding is completed. This process removes any excess weld material (spatter), improves the appearance of the weld, and can also enhance the joint’s mechanical properties.
  234. Welding Rules
    Welding rules are the set of guidelines or standards that govern the welding process. These rules ensure that welding is performed safely and effectively, and that the resulting joints meet the required quality and strength standards.
  235. Weld Crosswise
    Weld crosswise refers to a welding technique where the weld is applied in a direction that crosses the primary alignment of the parts being welded. This is often used to reinforce the joint or to connect intersecting components.
  236. Double-Vee Weld
    A double-vee weld is a joint design where the edges of the base materials are beveled on both sides to form a ‘V’ shape from each component, creating an ‘X’ shape when joined together. This allows for deep penetration and is typically used on thicker materials.
  237. Flash Butt-Welding
    Flash butt-welding is a resistance welding process where two components are brought together end-to-end and an electrical current is passed through them, causing the material to heat up and “flash.” The parts are then pressed together, forging them into a single piece. This method is commonly used for joining rails and other long sections of metal.
  238. One-Pass Weld
    A one-pass weld is a welding operation where the weld is completed in a single pass of the welding torch or electrode. This is typically used for thinner materials or when speed is a priority.
  239. Full-Penetration Weld
    A full-penetration weld is a type of weld that extends through the entire thickness of the material being joined, ensuring maximum joint strength. It is crucial in applications where the weld must have the same strength as the base material.
  240. Welding Gutter
    The term “welding gutter” is not a standard term in English welding terminology. If it refers to a form or channel used to guide welding operations, it could be a fixture or a tool that helps ensure consistent and accurate welds.
  241. Welding Crack
    A welding crack is a fracture or discontinuity in the weld metal caused by stresses during the welding process. Cracks can compromise the integrity of the weld and can lead to failure if not addressed.
  242. Weld Cracking
    Weld cracking is the occurrence of cracks in the weld area during or after the welding process. This defect is often a result of improper welding techniques, cooling rates, or material properties.
  243. Backing Weld
    A backing weld is the initial layer of weld applied to the root of a joint to ensure proper penetration and support for subsequent weld passes. It provides a foundation for building up the complete weld.
  244. Backing Welding
    Backing welding is the process of applying a backing weld. It is often performed using a backing strip or material that supports the molten weld pool and facilitates the formation of the initial weld layer.
  245. Hand Welding
    Hand welding is a manual welding process where an operator controls the welding torch or electrode by hand. It is versatile and commonly used for repair work, custom fabrication, and in situations where automated welding is impractical.
  246. Weld Wire
    Weld wire refers to the consumable wire used as filler material in various welding processes such as MIG (Metal Inert Gas) and TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welding. It is often coated or contains materials that improve its welding properties.
  247. Welding Code
    A welding code is a set of guidelines and requirements that specify the correct procedures and standards for welding operations. These codes ensure the safety and quality of welded structures and are enforced by various industry and government bodies.
  248. Welding Cycle
    The welding cycle encompasses the entire sequence of operations in a single weld, including the preheating, actual welding, and cooling phases. It is a critical factor in determining the quality and efficiency of the welding process.
  249. Ripple Weld
    A ripple weld is characterized by a wavy pattern on the surface of the weld bead, resembling ripples. This pattern is a natural result of the oscillation of the welding torch and can affect the weld’s aesthetics and sometimes its mechanical properties.
  250. Welding Mask
    A welding mask is a protective device worn by welders to shield their face and eyes from the intense light, UV radiation, and flying sparks produced during welding. It is an essential safety tool for preventing eye damage and other injuries.
  251. Weld Cycle
    Similar to the welding cycle, the weld cycle refers to the duration and sequence of a single welding operation from start to finish, including the timing of current application and cooling.
  252. Weld Jig
    A weld jig is a custom-designed tool used to hold and position workpieces securely during welding. It ensures repeatability and precision in the welding process, particularly in mass production.
  253. Welding Atmosphere
    The welding atmosphere refers to the environment around the weld pool, which can be controlled to prevent contamination and oxidation. This is often achieved using shielding gases in processes such as MIG and TIG welding.
  254. Welding Amperage
    Welding amperage is the measure of the electrical current used in the welding process. It is a critical parameter that affects the heat input, penetration, and overall quality of the weld.
  255. Welding Voltage
    Welding voltage is the potential difference applied across the welding circuit. It influences the arc length and stability, and along with amperage, it is a key setting for controlling the welding process.
  256. Multilayer Welding
    Multilayer welding is a welding technique where multiple layers of weld metal are deposited to create a joint, typically used in thick section welding. This method is employed to control heat input, reduce residual stresses, and minimize distortion. For instance, when welding a thick steel plate, the welder will lay down several passes of weld beads, allowing each to cool before applying the next, to build up the required weld thickness.
  257. Overhead Weld
    An overhead weld is completed with the weld joint above the welder. This is one of the four basic welding positions and is considered the most difficult due to the force of gravity causing molten metal to drip or sag. Overhead welding requires a high level of skill to control the weld pool and is commonly used in construction sites where welding cannot be performed in more favorable positions.
  258. Welding Data
    Welding data refers to the parameters and conditions that dictate how a welding process is performed. This includes voltage, current, travel speed, filler material type, gas flow, and heat input. Proper documentation and adherence to welding data are vital for achieving consistent and quality welds. For example, a weld procedure specification often outlines the welding data for a specific job.
  259. Flash Butt-Weld
    Flash butt-welding is a resistance welding process that joins components end to end using an electrical flashing process followed by the application of force. It is frequently used in joining rails, pipes, and other similar sections. The process involves clamping two parts in dies, bringing them together while passing a high current, which creates the flashing and heating, and then rapidly forcing them together to create the weld.
  260. Welding Precaution
    Welding precaution refers to the safety measures and best practices implemented to prevent accidents and health hazards during welding operations. This includes wearing appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE), ensuring proper ventilation, and following procedures for handling hot materials and preventing fires. For instance, welders must wear helmets with proper filters to protect their eyes from the arc’s intense light.
  261. Structural Welding
    Structural welding involves joining components that are used to support loads in building and construction applications. It requires adherence to specific codes and standards to ensure the integrity of the structure. A common example is the welding of steel beams and columns in the construction of a building’s framework.
  262. Oxy-Hydrogen Welding
    Oxy-hydrogen welding is a type of gas welding that uses a flame produced by burning hydrogen in oxygen to melt and join metals. It is less common than oxy-acetylene welding due to the lower temperature of the flame but is used in specialized applications where a cleaner flame is needed, such as in lead welding or when working with certain metals that can form undesirable compounds with acetylene.
  263. Incomplete-Penetration Weld
    An incomplete-penetration weld occurs when the weld metal does not extend through the entire thickness of the parts being joined. This defect can compromise the weld’s strength and integrity. It is often detected by nondestructive testing methods like ultrasonic testing. An example might be a fillet weld on a thick plate where the depth of the weld is insufficient.
  264. Sagged Weld
    A sagged weld is a defect that occurs when gravity causes the molten metal to sag or droop in the weld bead, leading to an uneven surface or a depression in the weld. This is often seen in overhead welding due to the challenging position and the need for precise control of the weld pool.
  265. Direct Arc Welding
    Direct arc welding is a manual arc welding process where the electric arc is struck directly between the electrode and the workpiece. It is a simple and versatile method often used for repair work and construction. An example is shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), commonly known as stick welding.
  266. Multiple-Row Weld
    Multiple-row welds involve multiple rows of weld beads placed side by side to cover a wider area. This technique is often used in situations where a single bead is not sufficient to provide the needed strength or fill a large joint. For instance, in the construction of heavy equipment, multiple-row welds may be used to join large components.
  267. Girth Weld
    A girth weld is a type of weld used to join the ends of pipes or cylindrical objects to form a circular seam. It is a critical component in pipeline construction and must be executed with high precision to ensure the integrity of the pipeline. For example, girth welds are used to join sections of a natural gas pipeline.
  268. Around Weld
    An around weld, also known as a circumferential weld, is similar to a girth weld and refers to a continuous weld that encircles a pipe or cylindrical component. It ensures a leak-proof seal and is essential in pressurized systems such as boilers or pressure vessels.
  269. Gas-Welding Flame
    The gas-welding flame is the heat source produced when a fuel gas, typically acetylene, is combusted with oxygen in a welding torch. The flame’s characteristics (such as temperature and shape) are adjusted for different welding tasks. For example, a neutral flame is used for most welding applications, while a carburizing flame may be used for certain types of metal.
  270. Puddle Welding
    Puddle welding refers to a technique where the metal is melted in a small localized area (the puddle) without the use of filler material, allowing the base metals to fuse as the puddle cools. It is commonly used in spot welding and in laying down weld beads in sheet metal work.
  271. Hammer Weld
    Hammer welding, also known as forge welding, is an ancient technique where metals are heated until they are nearly molten and then joined by hammering. This process is traditionally used by blacksmiths to join iron and steel and requires skillful control of temperature and hammering force.
  272. Plasma Welding
    Plasma welding is an arc welding process that uses a constricted arc and a mixture of gases to create a plasma jet of high temperature, capable of melting the workpiece and allowing for deep penetration welds. It is commonly used in aerospace applications due to its precision and control over heat input.
  273. Welding Metallurgy
    Welding metallurgy is the study of the physical and chemical changes that occur in metals during the welding process. It includes the examination of weldments to understand the effects of heat, cooling rates, and weld composition on the microstructure and properties of the metal. Welding metallurgy knowledge is crucial for developing welding procedures that yield strong and ductile joints.
  274. Welded Break
    A welded break refers to a fracture or failure that occurs at or near a welded joint. This can result from improper welding techniques, inadequate penetration, or the presence of defects such as cracks or inclusions. Understanding the causes of welded breaks is important for improving welding practices and preventing structural failures.
  275. Welding Mill
    A welding mill is a type of manufacturing equipment used to produce welded pipes and tubes. It forms and welds the material into tubular shapes using processes such as Electric Resistance Welding (ERW). Welding mills are integral in the production of pipes for various industries, including oil and gas, automotive, and construction.
  276. Welding Grade
    Welding grade refers to the classification of welding consumables such as electrodes and filler metals based on their mechanical properties, chemical composition, and intended use. Different grades are specified for different materials and welding conditions to ensure the quality and performance of the welded joint. For example, a 70XX welding grade electrode indicates a tensile strength of 70,000 pounds per square inch.
  277. Blacksmith’s Weld
    A blacksmith’s weld, also known as a forge weld, is a traditional method where heated metal pieces are joined by hammering. This technique has been used for centuries and is still practiced in ornamental ironwork and by artisans who value traditional craftsmanship.
  278. Gas-Welding Heat
    Gas-welding heat refers to the heat generated by the combustion of a fuel gas (like acetylene, propane, or hydrogen) with oxygen in a welding torch. This heat is used to melt the base metal and any filler material during the welding process. The amount of heat can be controlled by adjusting the gas flow and flame type.
  279. Welding Pool
    The welding pool, or weld pool, is the molten metal area formed during the welding process where filler metal and base metal merge. The size, shape, and behavior of the weld pool are crucial for weld quality and are influenced by heat input, welding speed, and the welder’s technique.
  280. Two-Axis Welding
    Two-axis welding involves the manipulation of the welding torch or workpiece along two different axes during the welding process. This allows for more complex welds and is often used in automated welding systems where precision and repeatability are important, such as in robotic welding.
  281. Welding Leads
    Welding leads refer to the electrical cables that connect the power source to the welding electrode and the workpiece. They are an essential part of the welding circuit and must be capable of carrying the high current required for welding without overheating or causing voltage drops.
  282. Vibration Welding
    Vibration welding is a solid-state welding process that joins materials by applying pressure and vibratory energy along the interface of the parts to be joined. It is commonly used for welding thermoplastics and other non-metal materials in the automotive and consumer goods industries.
  283. Tape Welding
    Tape welding is a variation of automated welding where a continuous strip of filler metal, or tape, is fed into the weld joint. This method is often used in surfacing applications and in industries where high deposition rates are required, such as in the manufacture of large steel plates.
  284. Welding Shaft
    A welding shaft typically refers to the shaft component that has been joined or repaired by welding. It is a critical process in various industries, including automotive and manufacturing, where the integrity of rotating shafts is essential for machinery operation.
  285. Gas Welded
    Gas welded describes a joint or material that has been joined using a gas welding process, where a fuel gas is combusted with oxygen to create the heat needed for welding. Gas welding is versatile and can be used for a variety of materials, including metals and plastics.
  286. Welded Bridge
    A welded bridge is a bridge structure where the components have been joined by welding. Welding is used in bridge construction due to its ability to create strong, durable joints that can withstand the stresses and loads experienced by bridges.
  287. Forge Welded
    Forge welded describes a joint that has been created using the forge welding process, which is a traditional blacksmithing technique. This method involves heating metal to a high temperature and then hammering the pieces together to create a bond.
  288. Pipeline Welding
    Pipeline welding is the process of joining sections of pipe together, typically used in the construction and maintenance of pipeline systems for the transportation of oil, gas, water, and other fluids. It requires skilled welders and adherence to strict standards to ensure the safety and reliability of the pipeline.
  289. Aluminothermic Weld
    Aluminothermic weld, also known as thermite welding, is a process that uses a chemical reaction between aluminum powder and metal oxide to produce molten metal and heat. This is used to join railway tracks and heavy steel sections where conventional welding is not feasible.
  290. Dry Weld
    Dry weld refers to a welding process performed without the use of external cooling or lubricating fluids. It is used in situations where the presence of such fluids could cause problems, such as in the welding of certain alloys or in environments where the introduction of liquids is undesirable.
  291. Production Weld
    Production weld refers to welding operations that are part of a manufacturing process, designed to produce a large number of identical or similar components. This often involves automated or semi-automated welding systems to ensure consistency and efficiency.
  292. Hydrogen Welding
    Hydrogen welding is a process that uses hydrogen as a fuel gas for the welding flame. It can produce a very hot flame and is used in specialized applications, such as welding high melting point metals or where a clean flame is required to avoid contamination.
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Shane
Author

Shane

Founder of MachineMFG

As the founder of MachineMFG, I have dedicated over a decade of my career to the metalworking industry. My extensive experience has allowed me to become an expert in the fields of sheet metal fabrication, machining, mechanical engineering, and machine tools for metals. I am constantly thinking, reading, and writing about these subjects, constantly striving to stay at the forefront of my field. Let my knowledge and expertise be an asset to your business.

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